National Acoustic Laboratories Library

Background noise can enhance cortical auditory evoked potentials under certain conditions (Record no. 2348)

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fixed length control field 02268naa a22002537a 4500
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control field OSt
005 - DATE AND TIME OF LATEST TRANSACTION
control field 20150116155343.0
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fixed length control field 150116b xxu||||| |||| 00| 0 eng d
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Transcribing agency National Acoustic Laboratories
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Personal name Papesh, Melissa A.
245 ## - TITLE STATEMENT
Title Background noise can enhance cortical auditory evoked potentials under certain conditions
520 3# - SUMMARY, ETC.
Summary, etc Objective: To use cortical auditory evoked potentials (CAEPs) to understand neural encoding in background<br/>noise and the conditions under which noise enhances CAEP responses.<br/>Methods: CAEPs from 16 normal-hearing listeners were recorded using the speech syllable/ba/presented<br/>in quiet and speech-shaped noise at signal-to-noise ratios of 10 and 30 dB. The syllable was presented<br/>binaurally and monaurally at two presentation rates.<br/>Results: The amplitudes of N1 and N2 peaks were often significantly enhanced in the presence of lowlevel<br/>background noise relative to quiet conditions, while P1 and P2 amplitudes were consistently<br/>reduced in noise. P1 and P2 amplitudes were significantly larger during binaural compared to monaural<br/>presentations, while N1 and N2 peaks were similar between binaural and monaural conditions.<br/>Conclusions: Methodological choices impact CAEP peaks in very different ways. Negative peaks can be<br/>enhanced by background noise in certain conditions, while positive peaks are generally enhanced by binaural<br/>presentations.<br/>Significance: Methodological choices significantly impact CAEPs acquired in quiet and in noise. If CAEPs<br/>are to be used as a tool to explore signal encoding in noise, scientists must be cognizant of how<br/>differences in acquisition and processing protocols selectively shape CAEP responses.<br/>Published by Elsevier Ltd. on behalf of International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology.
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Topical term or geographic name as entry element Electroencephalography
9 (RLIN) 209
650 ## - SUBJECT ADDED ENTRY--TOPICAL TERM
Topical term or geographic name as entry element Event related potential
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Topical term or geographic name as entry element Hearing
9 (RLIN) 43
650 ## - SUBJECT ADDED ENTRY--TOPICAL TERM
Topical term or geographic name as entry element Human
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Topical term or geographic name as entry element Speech
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Topical term or geographic name as entry element Presentation rate
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Personal name . Billings,Curtis J
700 ## - ADDED ENTRY--PERSONAL NAME
Personal name Baltzell, Lucas S
773 0# - HOST ITEM ENTRY
Relationship information xxx (2014) xxx–xxx
Title Clinical Neurophysiology
856 ## - ELECTRONIC LOCATION AND ACCESS
Uniform Resource Identifier <a href="http://dspace.nal.gov.au/xmlui/bitstream/handle/123456789/80/Background.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y">http://dspace.nal.gov.au/xmlui/bitstream/handle/123456789/80/Background.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y</a>
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Source of classification or shelving scheme
Koha item type Journal article

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