National Acoustic Laboratories Library

Transient and Steady State Auditory Responses With Direct Acoustic Cochlear Stimulation

By: Verhaert, NicolasMaterial type: ArticleArticleSubject(s): Acoustic hearing implant | Auditory brainstem response | Auditory steady state response | Direct acoustic cochlear stimulation | Electrophysiology | Mixed hearing loss | Objective measuresOnline resources: Click here to access online In: EAR & HEARING VOL. XX, NO. X, XXX–XXXAbstract: Direct acoustic cochlear implants directly stimulate the cochlear fluid of the inner ear by means of a stapes piston driven by an actuator and show encouraging speech understanding in noise results for patients with severe to profound mixed hearing loss. Auditory evoked potentials recorded in such patients would allow for the objective evaluation of the aided auditory pathway. The aim of this study was (1) to develop a stimulation setup for EEG recordings in subjects with direct acoustic cochlear implants, (2) to show the feasibility of recording auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) and auditory steady state responses (ASSRs), and (3) to analyze the relation between electrophysiological thresholds derived from these responses and behavioral thresholds.
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Direct acoustic cochlear implants directly stimulate the
cochlear fluid of the inner ear by means of a stapes piston driven by an
actuator and show encouraging speech understanding in noise results
for patients with severe to profound mixed hearing loss. Auditory evoked
potentials recorded in such patients would allow for the objective evaluation
of the aided auditory pathway. The aim of this study was (1) to
develop a stimulation setup for EEG recordings in subjects with direct
acoustic cochlear implants, (2) to show the feasibility of recording auditory
brainstem responses (ABRs) and auditory steady state responses
(ASSRs), and (3) to analyze the relation between electrophysiological thresholds derived from these responses and behavioral thresholds.

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