National Acoustic Laboratories Library

So, baby, how does it sound? Cortical assessment of infants with hearing aids

By: Dillon, Harvey
Material type: TextText In: The Hearing Journal Page Ten October 2005 • Vol. 58 • No. 10Abstract: But if you think Harvey is just about hearing aids, you need to know that both he and the NAL have a wide range of interests. Among these are methods for assessing and evaluating either hearing loss or the benefits of hearing aids, which is where this month’s article sits. Harvey tells me that, apart from cortical evaluation, many aspects of NAL’s recent work are heading upstream from the cochlea, including a new method for diagnosing auditory processing disorders in children. NAL is also active in the prevention of hearing loss and acoustic shock and in developing methods to convince people to protect their hearing from excessive noise, including leisure noise. For those of us who have relied on NAL’s insights on hearing aids, it’s comforting to know that amplification has not been forgotten, as, in addition to working on the NAL-NL2 prescription method, Harvey and his colleagues are evaluating the effectiveness of processing algorithms in hearing aids as well as devising new processing schemes. These Australians are busy people! Maybe I should go down under rather than underground to find our collection of Page Ten articles for 2006!
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But if you think Harvey is just about hearing
aids, you need to know that both he and
the NAL have a wide range of interests.
Among these are methods for assessing and
evaluating either hearing loss or the benefits
of hearing aids, which is where this month’s
article sits. Harvey tells me that, apart from
cortical evaluation, many aspects of NAL’s
recent work are heading upstream from the
cochlea, including a new method for diagnosing
auditory processing disorders in
children.
NAL is also active in the prevention of
hearing loss and acoustic shock and in developing
methods to convince people to protect
their hearing from excessive noise, including
leisure noise. For those of us who have relied
on NAL’s insights on hearing aids, it’s comforting
to know that amplification has not been
forgotten, as, in addition to working on the
NAL-NL2 prescription method, Harvey and
his colleagues are evaluating the effectiveness
of processing algorithms in hearing aids
as well as devising new processing schemes.
These Australians are busy people! Maybe
I should go down under rather than underground
to find our collection of Page Ten articles
for 2006!

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