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Can Children Substitute for Adult Listeners in Judging the Intelligibility of the Speech of Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing?

By: Kloibera , Diana TrueContributor(s): David J. ErtmerbMaterial type: ArticleArticleOnline resources: Click here to access online In: Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools Vol. 46 • 56–63 • January 2015Abstract: Assessments of the intelligibility of speech produced by children who are deaf or hard of hearing (D/HH) provide unique insights into functional speaking ability, readiness for mainstream classroom placements, and intervention effectiveness. The development of sentence lists for a wide age range of children and the advent of handheld digital recording devices have overcome two barriers to routine use of this tool. Yet, difficulties in recruiting adequate numbers of adults to judge speech samples continue to make routine assessment impractical. In response to this barrier, it has been proposed that children who are 9 years or older might be adequate substitutes for adult listener-judges (Ertmer, 2011).
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Assessments of the intelligibility of speech
produced by children who are deaf or hard of hearing
(D/HH) provide unique insights into functional speaking
ability, readiness for mainstream classroom placements,
and intervention effectiveness. The development of
sentence lists for a wide age range of children and the
advent of handheld digital recording devices have overcome
two barriers to routine use of this tool. Yet, difficulties in
recruiting adequate numbers of adults to judge speech
samples continue to make routine assessment impractical.
In response to this barrier, it has been proposed that children
who are 9 years or older might be adequate substitutes for
adult listener-judges (Ertmer, 2011).

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